Japanese knotweed: Taking over Britain?

Posted by Catherine - April 30, 2015 - Tips, Uncategorized

With its red stems and deep green leaves, it is a pretty enough plant.

But Japanese knotweed’s beauty belies the fact it has become the scourge of British homeowners.

It grows at a ridiculous rate, is near-impossible to get rid of and has ruined house sales – wiping thousands off property prices.

Just this week, a woman told how nearly half the value of her aunt’s home had been wiped off by the plant growing on an adjoining piece of land.

Elizabeth Abraham’s Swansea home should fetch around £80,000 – but now the 91-year-old has been told it will not sell for more than £45,000 because of the untamed wild weed.

Knotweed’s spread – through purposeful planting and it escaping – went undetected for years.

According to researchers at the University of Leicestershire, people sharing cuttings or disposing of unwanted plants was the “primary pattern of distribution” .

It was also spread through watercourses, and through the movement of soil for construction and road-building.

Knotweed expert Ann Connolly, who died in 2010, found one of the earliest examples of it being planted purposefully outside gardens was in Welsh coal-mining valleys in the 1960s and 70s as it was good for stabilising loose soil.

In its native Japanese volcanic landscape, the climate and regular deposits of ash would keep knotweed plants small, while the plant survived thanks to energy stores in its deep root system.

But in Britain, without these impediments, it grows unabated.

And at its most prolific it can grow up to 20cm EVERY DAY.

It can even grow through concrete and tarmac and its roots can go down up to 3m deep.

There are no natural predators either meaning the weed can grow unabated, swamping other plants and preventing them from getting any light.

And while it does not produce seeds it can grow from minuscule fragments of rhizomes – the underground network of stems and roots – meaning it spreads easily.

What can I do about it?

1. Dig it out.
Digging out Japanese knotweed is a possibility but leave any trace of its deep root system at your peril – it takes just 0.8g of root for a new plant to grow again.

And be careful about getting rid of it once it’s dug up – Japanese knotweed is classified as ‘controlled waste’ under the Environmental Protection Act 1990 and can only be disposed of at licensed landfill sites.

Or you could dry it out, and then burn it, or even bury it 5m deep – though that’s not practical for most gardeners.

2. Feed it to bugs
In 2010, experts introduced a Japanese bug, aphalara itadori, to the UK that feasts almost exclusively on knotweed.

It’s hoped this will become available to gardeners if it works.

3. Kill it with chemicals
You can turn to chemicals, especially treatments containing glyphosate, but beware: it can take up to five years’ treatment to finally be rid of the pesky plant.

4. Eat it
Or, you could eat the problem and cook your Japanese knotweed – though you’d need to eat A LOT to even come close to eradicating the problem.

If you are experiencing issues with knotweed we would be happy to help if we can or if you would like a new design to your garden please contact us.

 

Information found from here